Intimate Partner/Domestic Violence

43% of College Women Experience Violence and Abusive Dating Behaviors

Although intimate partner violence can affect persons of all races, ethnicities and socioeconomic backgrounds, women of color experience IPV at disproportionately high rates.
We believe VCU can become a safer campus

Interpersonal violence is defined as a pattern of behaviors that are designed to maintain power and control over a partner.  There are many ways a person can exert control over another, from threats and physical violence, to a glance that lets the other person know emotional or physical abuse is on its way.

What are your rights in a relationship? Find out here
  • To express your opinions and have them be respected
  • To have your needs be as important as your partner’s needs
  • To grow as an individual in your own way
  • To change your mind
  • To not take responsibility for your partner’s behavior
  • To not be physically, emotionally, verbally or sexually abused
  • To break up with or fall out of love with someone and not be threatened
Are you being abused? Find out here
  • Are you frightened by your partner’s temper?
  • Are you afraid to disagree?
  • Are you constantly apologizing for your partner’s behavior, especially when he or she has treated you badly?
  • Do you have to justify everything you do, everywhere you go, and everyone you see just to avoid your partner’s anger?
  • Does your partner put you down, but then tell you that they love you?
  • Have you ever been hit, kicked, shoved or had things thrown at you?
  • Do you not see friends or family because of your partner’s jealousy?
  • Have you ever been forced to have sex?
  • Are you afraid to break up because your partner has threatened to hurt themselves?
  • Has your partner ever threatened your life or the life of someone close to you?

Do you think you have a healthy relationship? Take this quiz.

Safety Planning is critical when you either in an abusive relationship or have recently left the relationship.

If you are still in the relationship:

  • Think of a safe place to go if an argument occurs - avoid rooms with no exits (bathroom), or rooms with weapons (kitchen).
  • Think about and make a list of safe people to contact.
  • Keep change with you at all times.
  • Keep a fully-charged cell phone and phone charger with you at all times.
  • Memorize all important numbers.
  • Establish a "code word" or "sign" so that family, friends, teachers or co-workers know when to call for help.
  • Think about what you will say to your partner if he\she becomes violent.

If you have left the relationship:

  • Change your phone number.
  • Screen calls.
  • Save and document all contacts, messages, injuries or other incidents involving the abuser.
  • Change locks, if the abusive partner has a key.
  • Avoid staying alone.
  • Plan how to get away if confronted by an abusive partner.
  • If you have to meet your former/current partner, do it in a public place.
  • Vary your routine.
  • Notify school and work contacts.
  • Call the YWCA for shelter: (804) 643-0888

If you leave the relationship or are thinking of leaving, you should take important papers and documents with you including student I.D., social security cards and birth certificates for you and your children, marriage license, leases or deeds in your name or both yours and your partner's names, your checkbook, your charge cards, bank statements and charge account statements, insurance policies, proof of income for you and your spouse (pay stubs or W-2's), and any documentation of past incidents of abuse (photos, police reports, medical records, etc.).

Additional Resources

Contact Us

815 S. Cathedral Place
Richmond, VA 23220

Phone: (804) VCU-WELL (828-9355)
Monday - Thursday, 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Friday, 10:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

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Get Help

VCU Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Services (M-Th 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m., F 10:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.)

24/7 VA Family Violence and Sexual Assault Hotline (800) 838-8238


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